Follow bookishnyc on Twitter
The habit of reading is the only enjoyment in which there is no alloy; it lasts when all other pleasures fade -- Anthony Trollope

« Celebrity "Bookish" Sighting | Main | Seen on the Subway »

August 19, 2010

Comments

Add a box of Charbonnel's or Lauduree macaroons and it would be exactly right ;-)

Joolsfw: My thoughts precisely! Thanks for stopping by.

Yes, yes, and yes. I would love to create this kind of warmth in my home library. And my husband loves Alex V's aesthetic, so maybe I can make it happen.

Hi Thomas: I'm always drooling over Vervoordt's designs, so let me know if you achieve anything close to this, and I'll be over for tea and bookish discussions one day.

I would like to add an ice cold G&T, but there really is nowhere to put the glass!
Margaret P

LOVE LOVE LOVE it! Though Margaret is right that the room needs a place for setting down a nice G&T.

Dear Margaret & Kerry: Not to worry -- there will always be a place in my version of this room (like that will ever happen!) for a nice tall G&T. (Or in my case, V&T.)

Oh, it has to be G&T! Plymouth Gin is the best, navy strength, with ice and lime. I once went around the Plymouth Gin distillery (in the Barbican, Plymouth, Devon, England for those of you outside the UK) and learned a lot about the making of gin. One thing which I hadn't realized is that it's ready for consumption - unlike whisky which has to be laid down for several years - the moment it's distilled! So they don't have to store it ... it's distilled, bottled and off to the shops with it! I was also informed by those who produce it that the "right" way to drink gin was with a little water, nothing else and certainly no ice or lemon/lime or tonic. I tried that whilst I was at the distillery and whether it was the surroundings or the water or what, I don't know, it was very nice, but I still prefer it icy cold, with tonic!

The comments to this entry are closed.

ABOUT ME

  • A 40-something Manhattan-ite (who, like most New Yorkers, came from Somewhere Else) who reads to escape her ghastly day job as a lawyer.

statcounter